If the newspaper business is doomed, why is Johnston Press paying £24m for the i?
If the newspaper business is doomed, why is Johnston Press paying £24m for the i?
Whether you read, or were a fan of, the publication in question or not, the closure of a national newspaper is always an event, and a cause for reflection. First of all, it’s a relatively rare occurrence; and secondly, anything that reduces the size of the pool, or shrinks its diversity, is something that anyone who values a competitive and diverse press pack will worry about. And of course there are the job losses.

Apple needs to think different – and open its wallet
Apple needs to think different – and open its wallet
Apple has been the world’s most valuable company (at least measured by its market cap, if not sales) for so long now that it’s easy to forget that it was not always so.

Back in the late 1990s, before the return of co-founder Steve Jobs, Apple was months – some say weeks – away from bankruptcy. The launch of the famous all-in-one 'Bondi Blue' iMac in 1998, accompanied by the clever 'Think Different' ad campaign, helped set it on its way.
Publicis deserves credit for looking forward, not back, on its 90th birthday
Publicis deserves credit for looking forward, not back, on its 90th birthday
We tend to think of advertising and marketing as very modern businesses – especially when we think of channels such as digital, mobile and eCRM.

But the truth is, advertising of one sort or another goes back centuries, back to the dawn of capitalism; some would argue way, way before that – the ancient Egyptians wrote commercial messages on papyrus and stick them on walls, while evidence of what we might call today 'outdoor advertising' has been found in the ruins of Pompeii. In Britain, the first modern capitalist economy, companies were using posters, newspaper ads and trade cards to sell their wares as early as the mid-1750s.
Who's going to be buying who in 2016? The media and marketing firms in acquirers' sights this year
 Who's going to be buying who in 2016? The media and marketing firms in acquirers' sights this year
While a busy year overall, 2015 was a fairly quiet one in terms of big pure-marcomms M&A activity, for obvious reasons – there aren’t that many large independent properties for the big groups to snap up; most of them have been bought!

With Publicis’ multi-billion-dollar purchase last February of the Sapient group, there are virtually no independent shops of scale left to buy.

2016: The year Yahoo will be broken up?
2016: The year Yahoo will be broken up?
Yahoo’s high-profile chief, Marissa Meyer, is rarely out of the news these days, whether it’s for having twins then dashing back to work; holding lavish $7m parties to the chagrin of certain investors; or buying up firms left right and centre.

Miss Meyer has been nothing if not acquisitive since she became chief. I did a quick calculation and it seems that Yahoo has bought no fewer than 44 startups and established firms since she took over in 2012. The most high-profile of these have been micro-blogging site Tumblr, mobile analytics firm Flurry, ad tech specialist BrightRoll, and, just six months ago, the fashion and style community Polyvore.

How can we help you?